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Author Guidelines

Submit to the Journal

Classroom Action Research Journal (CARJO) uses Open Journal System to peer review manuscript submission. All submission should be made online. Please login or make a username for first time user.

Registration and Access is available at http://journal2.um.ac.id/index.php/carjo/user/register. These instructions will ensure we have everything required so your article can move through peer review, production, and publication smoothly. Please take the time to read and follow them as closely as possible, as doing so will ensure your paper matches the journal’s requirements.

If you are unable to find the information you need in the author guidelines, please email carjo.journal@um.ac.id for assistance.

 

Manuscript Preparation

1. General Guidelines

Article submitted to Classroom Action Research Journal (CARJO) should be original contributions and should not be under consideration for any publication at the same time. We are especially interested in research and critical thinking related to classroom action research

Manuscripts are accepted in English.

All authors of a manuscript should include their full name and affiliation(s). One author should be identified as the corresponding author. He/she must include an email address. Please note that once published, your email address will normally be displayed in the article permanently. 

2. Article Components

Manuscripts should be compiled in the following order: title; abstract; keywords; main text (consist of introduction; literature review; method; results and discussion; conclusion); references.

Title and Abstract. The title and the abstract are key elements that inform the reader of the contents of the manuscript. Given the title’s prominence, authors should exercise thought and creativity in selecting a title that will capture the reader’s attention and clearly inform the reader of the contents within.

Similarly, the abstract is read by far more readers than is the average article. The abstract serves important purposes in summarizing the hypothesis, design, and findings of the study and in representing the article in indexing databases. The abstract contains an introduction, method, results, and discussion.

Introduction. A strong introduction engages the reader in the problem of interest and provides a context for the study at hand. In introducing the research concern, the writer should provide a clear rationale for why the problem deserves new research, placing the study in the context of current knowledge and prior theoretical and empirical work on the topic.

Literature Review (Optional). In reviewing the research literature, the author’s task is to indicate the main directions taken by workers in the area and the main issues of methodology and interpretation that have arisen. Particular attention must be given to a critical analysis of previous methodology and the exposition of the advantages and limitations inherent in various alternatives. Close attention must be given to conceptual and theoretical formulations that are explicit or implicit within the selected studies.

Method. In both quantitative and qualitative research, the use of appropriate methods of participants sampling, study design, measures, and statistical analysis critically influences the study’s methodological soundness. A good methodology should be clean and clear. Clean means the use of appropriate, valid, and unflawed methods of sampling and use of instruments, procedures, and analysis. Clear means the ideal method is written in a clear manner, such that another researcher could duplicate the study.

Results and Discussion. The results section should include a summary of the collected data and analyses, which follows from the analytic plan. All results should be described, including unexpected findings. Authors should include both descriptive statistics and test of significance.

In the discussion session, the writers evaluate and interpret the findings. This section should begin with a statement of support or nonsupport for the original hypotheses in light of the findings. If the hypotheses were not supported, the author considers post hoc explanations. In interpreting the results, authors consider sources of bias and other threats to internal validity, imprecision of measures, overall number of tests, or overlap among tests, effect sizes, and other weaknesses of the study.

Conclusion. In a conclusion, you summarize your findings and explain the implications of your work (including hard numbers with uncertainty estimates). Conclusions contain no new data or findings. You may also include Recommendations for improvements to the apparatus or method, or suggestions for future research on the subject at hand. 

Tables and Figures. Table and figures are particularly valuable for conveying large amounts of information and for showing relationships among data. However, tables and figures should be kept to a minimum and contain only essential data. All diagrams, charts, and graphs should be referred to as figures. It is the authors’ responsibility to make sure to obtain permissions to display tables and figures from third parties.

References. In the references section, only include previous works that cited in the text. References should be cited in the text according to the APA reference system (www.apastyle.org), that is, use the last name of the author(s), the date of publication and, following quoted material. The reference list should include every work cited in the text. Please ensure that dates, spelling, and title used in the text are consistent with those listed in the references.

APA publishes references in a hanging indent format, meaning that the first line of each reference is set flush left and subsequent lines are indented. Some examples are given below: 

Books

Mankiw, N.G. (2014). Principles of Macroeconomics (seventh edition). United States: Cengage Learning

Journal

Witjaksono, M. (2014). Siparti 3-S, Triple Helix, and Social Capital in Strengthening Local Competitive Industries in Indonesia. Journal of Economics and Sustainable Development, 5(3), 21-33.

Wulandari, B., & Narmaditya, B.S. (2015). Dampak Literasi Keuangan Pada Akses Layanan Keuangan: Studi Pada Kepemilikan Asuransi di Malang. Jurnal Ekonomi & Studi Pembangunan, 7(1), 63-67.

Proceedings

Wulandari, D & Narmaditya, B.S. (2016). Using Simulation Methods to Improve Student Learning. 2nd International Conference on Education: 1, 1-6. Bangkok, Thailand: TKIIM.

Newspaper article

Brummitt, C. (2016, May 16). This Asian Lets You Borrow Cash and Pay in Trash. Retrieved from https://www.bloomberg.com

Newspaper article-without an author

Internet Pioner to oversee network redesign. (2017, March 7). Waste Bank Cut Down Trash Volume in Central Jakarta. Retrieved from http://www.thejakartapost.com

Working Paper

Lusardi, A., & Tufano, P. (2009). Debt literacy, financial experience, and overindebtedness. NBER Working Paper 14808.

Thesis or Dissertation-Print

Yunikawati, N.A. (2012). Pengaruh Status Sosial Ekonomi Orang Tua, Pendidikan Ekonomi Keluarga, Terhadap Financial Literacy dan Gaya Hidup serta Dampaknya Pada Rasionalitas Konsumsi (Survei Pada Mahasiswa S1 Pendidikan FE UM) (Unpublished Thesis), Universitas Negeri Malang, Indonesia

3. Style Guidelines

Manuscripts length: Between 10 to 30 pages.

Font: Times New Roman, 12 pts, single space, A4 paper, justify alignment.

Margins: Left 4 cm, right 3 cm, top 3 cm, bottom 3 cm.

File type: Microsoft Word (doc., docx.)

 

Please find Classroom Action Research Journal template

 

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  2. The submission file is in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, RTF, or WordPerfect document file format.
  3. The text is single-spaced; uses a 12-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.
  4. The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines, which is found in About the Journal.
 

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